Covid-19 and the Eyes

With all the panic over the COVID-19 and the mass hysteria over it we decided it was time to address it in conjunction with your eyes. With a little help from Reena Mukamal and DR. Sonal Tuli from the American Academy of Ophthalmology we have a few answers.

Experts say guarding your eyes — as well as your hands and mouth — can slow the spread of coronavirus. Here’s why the eyes are so important in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, and five ways you can help.

Coronavirus can spread through the eyes but needs direct contact

Coronavirus causes mild to severe respiratory illness. Symptoms such as fever, cough and shortness of breath can show up 2 to 14 days after a person is exposed. People with severe infections can develop pneumonia and die from complications of the illness.

Limiting eye exposure can help. Here’s why:

  • When a sick person coughs or talks, virus particles can spray from their mouth or nose into another person’s face. You’re most likely to inhale these droplets through your mouth or nose, but they can also enter through your eyes.
  • People who have coronavirus can also spread the illness through their tears. Touching tears or a surface where tears have landed can be another portal to infection.
  • You can also become infected by touching something that has the virus on it — like a table or doorknob — and then touching your eyes.

Coronavirus may cause pink eye — but it’s rare

If you see someone with pink eye, don’t panic. It doesn’t mean that person is infected with coronavirus. But health officials believe viral pink eye, or conjunctivitis, develops in about 1% to 3% of people with coronavirus. The virus can spread by touching discharge from an infected person’s eyes.

Three ways to help yourself and others:

“It’s important to remember that although there is a lot of concern about coronavirus, common sense precautions can significantly reduce your risk of getting infected. So wash your hands a lot, follow good contact lens hygiene and avoid touching or rubbing your nose, mouth and especially your eyes,” says ophthalmologist Sonal Tuli, MD, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

1. If you wear contact lenses, switch to glasses for a while.

Contact lens wearers touch their eyes more than the average person. “Consider wearing glasses more often, especially if you tend to touch your eyes a lot when your contacts are in. Substituting glasses for lenses can decrease irritation and force you to pause before touching your eye,” Dr. Tuli advises. If you continue wearing contact lenses, follow these hygiene tips to limit your chances of infection.

2. Wearing glasses may add a layer of protection.

Corrective lenses or sunglasses can shield your eyes from infected respiratory droplets. But they don’t provide 100% security. The virus can still reach your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms of your glasses. If you’re caring for a sick patient or potentially exposed person, safety goggles may offer a stronger defense.

3. Avoid rubbing your eyes.

We all do it. While it can be hard to break this natural habit, doing so will lower your risk of infection. If you feel an urge to itch or rub your eye or even to adjust your glasses, use a tissue instead of your fingers. Dry eyes can lead to more rubbing, so consider adding moisturizing drops to your eye routine. If you must touch your eyes for any reason — even to administer eye medicine — wash your hands first with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

And don’t forget …

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers general guidelines for preventing the spread of coronavirus and protecting your health:

    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    • You should especially wash your hands before eating, after using the restroom, sneezing, coughing or blowing your nose.
    • If you can’t get to a sink, use a hand sanitizer that has at least 60% alcohol.
    • Avoid touching your face — particularly your eyes, nose, and mouth.
    • If you cough or sneeze, cover your face with your elbow or a tissue. If you use a tissue, throw it away promptly. Then go wash your hands.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. If you think someone has a respiratory infection, it’s safest to stay 6 feet away.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Regularly disinfect commonly touched surfaces and items in your house, such as doorknobs and counter tops.

In other words just use common sense to keep yourself at a low risk for contracting Coronavirus.

At Schmidt’s Optical and Hearing™ in Stuart Florida not only do we care about your eyes but we care about your overall healthy too. That’s why we always take the necessary and common sense precautions to make sure no pathogens are transmitted in our office. Come in today and try on glasses with confidence. With our great service and great prices you’ll see why we have been the Treasure Coasts go to optical for the last 40 years.

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